Previous studies

Children's use of social consensus as a cue to reliability

In everyday life, people must continually weigh up the reliability of new information that is presented to them by others in order to avoid being led astray by false claims (e.g., mistakes, lies). This task is particularly crucial in development as children's knowledge acquisition depends heavily on information that they receive from others.
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Evaluation of Health Visitors' assessment of mother-child interactions

Health visitors are on the front line for identifying possible problems in mother-infant relationships so it is important that their evaluations are as accurate as possible. Mothers and babies were invited to the BabyLab where their interactions were observed and video-recorded. Health visitors were then invited to rate the quality of the interactions and their ratings were compared with objective ratings made by the researchers using a standardised scoring system.
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Children's perception of real and pretend worlds

Children's intuitions about the relationship between real and cartoon people and real and cartoon worlds were explored. We were interested in finding out whether children think that cartoon people can interact in the real world and vice versa or do they think that each world should be separate?
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The Power of Print: Children's Trust in What They Read

Previous research has shown that children actively evaluate the reliability of spoken information, however relatively little is known about how children evaluate written information. Once a child learns to read, written sources present a large opportunity to learn new information, although this is not always reliable, especially with the availability of information on the internet.
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